Black Quotidian: Everyday History in African-American Newspapers

Invitation to Contribute

I would love to have other faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students contribute to Black Quotidian.  Please e-mail me <matthew.delmont[at]asu.edu> and let me know what you would like to post on.  I will be experimenting with different types of posts over the course of the year, so I welcome creative ways of using black newspapers.  You do not need to know how to use Scalar or have any particular technical skills.  If your institution does not subscribe to ProQuest Historical Black Newspapers, e-mail me and I can help you find a select of articles related to your research interests.  There are also a number of historical African American newspapers that are available online on an open access basis. I am happy to have posts on from these newspapers as well. 

I'm trying to coordinate the historical articles by date (e.g., January 18, 1969 posted on Jan 18, 2016), so the first step would be identifying a particular article/advertisement/news item from a historical date and then working on a post related to that.  I'm very open in terms of the length and structure of the posts, I'm picturing anywhere between 100 and 1000 words depending on what people want to say.  

Guidelines for undergraduate contributors
A number of professors are planning to have students write posts for Black Quotidian as a course assignment, and I am excited about these collaborations.  Here are a few suggestions for undergraduate contributors:These suggestions are meant to guide your post and are not meant to be a quiz or checklist where you need to answer each question.  While your professor and/or I will see the post first, please remember that are writing for a larger online audience.  Share a draft of your post with friends, classmates, roommates, or relatives and ask for their suggestions.  Overall, you should aim for your posts to be analytical and engaging (i.e., focus on what is interesting and important about the item you are posting and don’t be boring).  

In sum, this project is about intellectual curiosity and discovery and I am eager to see what you find and to hear what you have to say.